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Stochastic statistics education: Randomly making the world a better place

This is a post about a bad idea leading to a good one.

The bad idea: stochastic terrorism. I stumbled on a new term recently in an article shared by a friend, “stochastic terrorism.”  Like any good statistician, I was fascinated (and a bit terrified).  What could it mean?  

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Stochastic statistics education: Randomly making the world a better place
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Statistician reacting to Statisticians (and others) reacting to the news: A meta-post with reading recommendations

Writers from both inside and outside statistics have taught me a great deal about thinking about data, data analysis, statistics, measurement AND about communicating statistics to the public. I have been inspired, and my thinking has been shaped by these contributions. I want to share some recommendations in this post.

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Statistician reacting to Statisticians (and others) reacting to the news: A meta-post with reading recommendations
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To bike or not to bike … in a group?

As the world waits for the vaccine, many people wonder what activities are safe to help pass the time. I am the same, wondering if it is safe to bike outside in a group or not. 

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To bike or not to bike … in a group?
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The accidental experiment that saved 700 lives

Paul Alper sends along this news article by Sarah Kliff, who writes: “Three years ago, 3.9 million Americans received a plain-looking envelope from the Internal Revenue Service. Inside was a letter stating that they had recently paid a fine for not carrying health insurance and suggesting possible ways to enroll in coverage. . . .”

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The accidental experiment that saved 700 lives
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Informed decision making by protest, not by statistics and data science

It is very worrisome to see governments of developing countries, such as Nigeria, not using evidence from statistics and data science to inform decision making – rather relying on protest and strike actions by the populace.

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Informed decision making by protest, not by statistics and data science
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The Danish face mask study

The Swedish approach to the COVID-19 crisis stands out compared to the rest of the developed world in several ways. One of these is the extremely low percentage of the population wearing face masks.

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The Danish face mask study
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The curious incident of infected young people

Around the middle of July 2020, the Italian National Institute of Health released statistics on the Covid-19 situation in the country, and it appeared that a substantial number of confirmed cases were concentrated in 19 to 50 year olds, making up 47% of the total, and the average age of those who tested positive was 46 years old — compared to 61 at the beginning of the pandemic. Should we conclude younger people are more likely to get infected today? Possibly yes, but it depends.

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The curious incident of infected young people
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Pandemic and Statistics Marriage: Happy or not? Can we make it work?

The world is immersed in the worst cataclysm of the last 100 years. The quality of the data and the transparency of the methods worldwide is key to solve it. The International Statistical Institute (ISI) may have a leading role in their improvement.

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Pandemic and Statistics Marriage: Happy or not? Can we make it work?