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Peanut butter, anyone?

There is a lot of talk about how this ghastly pandemic is affecting the economy. The other day, I came across an article in the The New York Times which focused on one facet of this topic: inflation in the UK. Forecasting inflation right now is difficult because of the pandemic: sudden changes in consumer spending, disruptions in supply chains, and government interventions ameliorate its effects.

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Peanut butter, anyone?
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Informed decision making by protest, not by statistics and data science

It is very worrisome to see governments of developing countries, such as Nigeria, not using evidence from statistics and data science to inform decision making – rather relying on protest and strike actions by the populace.

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Informed decision making by protest, not by statistics and data science
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Queues instead of parades

Crisp morning air, a final round of barbeques, the closing of outdoor pools. Labor Day, the first Monday of September, unofficially signifies the end of summer in the US and officially celebrates the American worker. But what does this labor-centric holiday mean during a global pandemic?

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Queues instead of parades
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A double lock-down in Palestine

The Palestinian economy is vulnerable. It has been exposed to a series of ongoing shocks that have weakened its ability to be resilient against internal and external crises, like the pandemic. Official statistics are crucial to understanding the effects of such crises on vulnerable sectors of the population.

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A double lock-down in Palestine