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How data privacy methods can hide the real data story

When state governments within the United States issued stay-at-home orders in 2020, companies started providing interactive data visualizations and dashboards to show how well or not so well certain regions of the United States were social distancing. Unacast, a technology company out of New York state, was one of them. They gathered smartphone data from up to 15 percent of people in every county of the United States, and then assigned grades to each state based on how much smartphone users traveled after COVID-19 related closures, compared to before.

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How data privacy methods can hide the real data story
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To bike or not to bike … in a group?

As the world waits for the vaccine, many people wonder what activities are safe to help pass the time. I am the same, wondering if it is safe to bike outside in a group or not. 

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To bike or not to bike … in a group?
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The accidental experiment that saved 700 lives

Paul Alper sends along this news article by Sarah Kliff, who writes: “Three years ago, 3.9 million Americans received a plain-looking envelope from the Internal Revenue Service. Inside was a letter stating that they had recently paid a fine for not carrying health insurance and suggesting possible ways to enroll in coverage. . . .”

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The accidental experiment that saved 700 lives
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Uncertainty and prediction

A Danish proverb asserts that Prediction is hard – especially about the future. Prediction is especially hard when it comes to describing uncertainty. Today, the US votes (or finishes voting) on the next President, and there is a lot of interest in forecasting, formal or informal.

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Uncertainty and prediction